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Brewer Burns

Tuesday, November 07, 2006

Why I Vote

I am a young woman. Less than half of the eligible female voters in this country voted in the last national election. I want my voice to count.

I hope to live a good, long life. I will turn 80 in the year 2059. Will there be social security available to me? What will the size of the national debt be? What about Medicaid and Medicare? Will they be available? All of these things are influenced by what our elected representatives do NOW.

I am a young woman. It is my duty as a citizen of this country to weigh in on issues that are important enough to make it onto the ballot, and to actively participate in the choosing of the people who will represent my area of this country.

I hope to live a good, long life. If global warming continues, will I be able to do that? All of these things are influenced by what our elected representatives do NOW.

I am a young woman. Eligible voters aged 18-25 are the least likely to exercise their right to vote. That means that elected officials feel no desire to attend to the needs and wants of those people in that age range. Imagine what would happen if they actually voted.

I hope to live a good, long life. Will I always have healthcare available to me? What if I lose my job or my employer drops the company plan? If I have to buy my own health insurance, can I afford that and will I be able to afford it in the future? All of these things are influenced by what our elected representatives do NOW.

I am a young woman. I will be able to reproduce for (probably, approximately) the next 18? 20? years. If I want to have a baby, will I have the right to receive adequate pre and post natal care? If I don’t want to have a baby will reliable forms of birth control be available to me? Will I always have access to an abortion? What if my life is in danger? All of these things are influenced by what our elected representatives do NOW.

I have three nieces and one nephew. I want them all to live good, long lives. My youngest niece will be 80 in the year 2086. What will the world be like then? Will she have access to health care throughout her life? Will she have access to pre and post natal care if she chooses to have children? If she chooses to not have children or to wait, will she have easy access to reliable forms of birth control? Will she have access to an abortion? What if her life is in danger? Will she have access to good, affordable, end of life care? All of these things are influenced by what our elected representatives do NOW.

Vote. Vote for the person that you think will do the best job representing your interests on the local, state, and national level, even if that means that you write yourself in. Take a few minutes to read up on the initiatives and referendums on your ballot. Do you want these laws to be enacted or not? Vote. Make your voice count. There are people all around the world who fight for the right to vote, and who risk their lives in exercising that right. Let us not be a country full of apathetic people. Let’s be a country full of people that vote.

2 Comments:

At 5:45 PM, Anonymous John Hanscom said...

Very Nice. It reminds me a lot of Sojourner Truth's great "... And, Ain't I A Woman ..." speech:

Sojourner Truth (1797-1883): Ain't I A Woman?
Delivered 1851
Women's Convention, Akron, Ohio

Well, children, where there is so much racket there must be something out of kilter. I think that 'twixt the negroes of the South and the women at the North, all talking about rights, the white men will be in a fix pretty soon. But what's all this here talking about?

That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me any best place! And ain't I a woman? Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And ain't I a woman? I could work as much and eat as much as a man - when I could get it - and bear the lash as well! And ain't I a woman? I have borne thirteen children, and seen most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with my mother's grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain't I a woman?

Then they talk about this thing in the head; what's this they call it? [member of audience whispers, "intellect"] That's it, honey. What's that got to do with women's rights or negroes' rights? If my cup won't hold but a pint, and yours holds a quart, wouldn't you be mean not to let me have my little half measure full?

Then that little man in black there, he says women can't have as much rights as men, 'cause Christ wasn't a woman! Where did your Christ come from? Where did your Christ come from? From God and a woman! Man had nothing to do with Him.

If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, these women together ought to be able to turn it back , and get it right side up again! And now they is asking to do it, the men better let them.

Obliged to you for hearing me, and now old Sojourner ain't got nothing more to say.

 
At 9:41 AM, Blogger Marj aka Thriver said...

I'm so glad you vote. I almost didn't this year. With all the sh*t that's hit the fan lately, I was just feeling sorry for myself and kinda, "Why bother? What's the use?" b.s. But, I did and I'm glad I did.

Hey,I just wanted to give you a hug for being so sweet and continuing to check in on me. I appreciate you so greatly. (((((BB)))))

 

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